KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm mildot scope review

posted in: Gear Review, What's New | 0

Whether you are target shooting for recreation or hunting for food, having a good scope is a great way to improve your chances on long range hits.  There are literally hundreds of scopes available to consumers, ranging in price from under $30 to over $3000.  So what’s the difference?  Basically, it’s the overall quality of the scope.  Take the lens for example.  How clear is lens A compared to lens B?  That depends of the type of sand used in production of the lens, how well the sand was processed, the degree to which the lens was polished, and the coating used on the final lens.  The overall quality of the lens is built into every one of these steps and the more quality generally equals more money.  Now before running out and buying the most expensive scope, first determine your need.  If your life depends on it, spend the money.  If not, then you may be content with finding a scope that’s serviceable without breaking the bank.

KonusPro M30 scopes

I currently use a Leupold 3-10x50mm tactical on my Winchester model 70.  The Leupold has served me well for many years, however, it lacks mildots, a feature I’ve learned to love after serving in the military.  I began my search for a possible replacement  scope to put on my Winchester.  After some time on the internet, I decided to give the KonusPro M30 scope another try.  I say another try because in one of my previous reviews, I looked into the KonusPro M30 1.5-6x44mm when I was searching for optics for my AR15.  Ultimately, I went with an Aimpoint PRO for my AR15 due to the KonusPro not returning to zero.  As mentioned in that article, it could have been me that threw the shots, which I why I gave KonusPro another try.  Mike from Scope City in Costa Mesa came through once again, providing me with the KonusPro 4.5-16x40mm for review.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm mildot scope review

I’ll save you the boring pictures of the packaging since it looks exactly the same as the KonusPro M30 1.5-6x44mm box.  Anyway, here are some overall pictures of the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm scope.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm front 3/4 view
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm front 3/4 view (right)

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm top view
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm top view
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm front 3/4 view (left)
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm front 3/4 view (left)
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm rear view
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm rear view

As you can see in the photos above, the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm looks almost identical to the other scopes in the M30 series. All parts of this scope (except the included lens covers) is made of metal.  This is good news to me since plastic parts represents cut corners in production.  The KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm has a 30mm main tube and includes the 30mm scope mount.  The front objective lens is 40mm (the same diameter as the current military issued M3A Leupold) and comes with plastic lens covers and a 4″ sunshade.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope with 4" sunshade installed
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope with 4″ sunshade installed
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope without sunshade
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope without sunshade

It’s kind of hard to see in the picture, but the front objective lens appears to have a greenish coating on it.  At a price of around $350, I really doubt the coating is flourite (the preferred coating on scopes for it ability to transmit natural colors), although I have no doubt that it’s better than nothing.  The purpose of the coating is, in a nutshell, to prevent the light rays from dispersing which causes color change and a hazy look.  Looking through the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm under both day light and night time conditions, I can honestly say the quality of the lens isn’t bad at all.  The KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm was very comparable in optical quality to my Leupold with only the slightest bit of light falloff and fringing at the edges.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope's front lens element.  You can see a slight green tint from the lens coating.
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope’s front lens element. You can see a slight green tint from the lens coating.

In the middle of the main tube are the turrets.  On the left is the side focus dial.  It’s a medium sized dial that’s smooth with just enough resistance to prevent accidental changes.  The dial itself is clearly marked with numbers representing meters.  Upon manipulating the dial, I found the focus dial to work well, bringing everything from 10 yards to infinity sharply into focus.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm focus dial as seen from the side
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm focus dial as seen from the side.  Notice the white dot indicating focal length.  This dot is useless since it cannot be seen from the shooting position (hidden behind the rear scope ring).
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm focus dial as seen from the front
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm focus dial as seen from the front.  Notice the clear yardage marking.

On top and to the right are the elevation and windage dial (as seen in the picture below).  As with all the M30 scopes, the adjustments felt nice and crisp with audible clicks. The only thing I wasn’t too fond of was the increments of adjustment.  Coming from a Leupold M3A scope, I’m used to much bolder adjustments (1MOA elevation & 1/2MOA windage) vs the fine adjustments of the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm (1/8MOA for both elevation and windage).  I suppose if I was a great shot with the right setup, the 1/8 MOA adjustments would make a difference, but since I’m not, I found the adjustments took longer than I had wished.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm focus dial as seen from the rear
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm adjustment dials as seen from the shooting position

Another down side to having such fine adjustments is the total adjustments available.  Going from the full mechanical “Down” position to the “Up” position revealed 83 total minutes of adjustment.  Not too bad, but with a 30mm tube, I expected more.  The windage also had similar totals with 85 minutes of adjustment.  One more thing to note here.  There has been some confusion on the internet with regards to the KonusPro M30 scopes being a first focal plane (FFP) scope.  I know the size of the cam box may give the appearnce that it is a FFP scope, but I can assure anyone out there that it is NOT a first focal plane.  It is a second focal plane scope.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm adjustment dials (top view)
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm adjustment dials (top view)

Where the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm beats my Leupold is that it has an illuminated mildot reticle.  First off, I love mildots.  You can estimate range, lead shots, and most of all I’m used to it.  On top of that the illumination aids in picking up your reticle in low light situation, especially when targeting dark objects.  There is nothing more frustrating than not being able to see your reticles when it’s time to get serious.   As seen in the pictures below, the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x4omm has illumination in both red and blue.  I personally don’t need both colors, but if anything, KonusPro gives you a choice.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm reticle illumination dial showing red
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm reticle illumination dial showing red
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm reticle illumination dial showing blue
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm reticle illumination dial showing blue
The mildots in the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope
The mildots in the KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope.  The target is a 1″ PVC tube.  I call 2.65mils.  Doing the math gives me 9.58m (31.43ft) .  I measured 30.5 ft with a tape measure which means I was within the 3% margin of error while utilizing a scope.  I can live with that.

One minor thing that I really appreciate with KonusPro scopes is that they come with scope mounts.  They fit nicely and appear to provide a secure connection between the rifle and scope.  It’s all metal with 4 allen screws (2 per side) per ring.  The mount will fit on any Weaver or picatinny rail with 3 securing screws.  Unlike the M21 SWS, KonusPro USA does not provide a torque wrench so I had to sort of tighten to feel.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope's included scope mount
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope’s included scope mount

After the scope was mounted on my Winchester, I noticed I could not move the scope forward enough to gain proper eye relief.  Perhaps the cam box on the scope is too large or positioned too far back on the scope, but in order for me to use the scope, I’m going to have to extend the butt-stock.

KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope mounted atop the Winchester Model 70
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope mounted atop the Winchester Model 70
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope mounted atop the Winchester Model 70
KonusPro M30 4.5-16x40mm scope mounted atop the Winchester Model 70

One last thing I’d like to mention is the height of the scope in relation to the barrel.  To minimize parallax, the scope should be mounted as close to the barrel as possible.  With the provided KonusPro scope mount, I did notice the scope sat higher than I would like.  If the scope holds up to my field test and holds its zero, I will be replacing the scope rings with a lower mounting ones.

KonusPro M30's included scope mount.  Note how high the scope sits in relation to the barrel.
KonusPro M30′s included scope mount. Note how high the scope sits in relation to the barrel.

I haven’t had a chance to take this scope out for a field test yet so I can’t comment on it’s performance.  But upon visual inspection, the scope appears to be built with a level of quality that surpasses it’s price point.  Once the field test is complete, I will update this article with the results.  In the meantime, there are a lot more pictures of this scope in the photo album in the Tactical Gear section of the Photo Gallery.

UPDATE 16Dec2011:

I had a chance to finally field test the scope.  I only had a short amount of time so I conducted a brief box test as seen in the video below.  The test isn’t thorough (I would have liked to shoot with the scope for a couple of days), but so far, the scope seems to be holding its own.

~ John, Modern Bushman

Leave a Reply